Further Information

Monograph 8: Changes in Cigarette-Related Disease Risks and Their Implications for Prevention and Control | National Cancer Institute
Article Published: 1996

Details:
Type: Official report
Published By: National Cancer Institute

Further Information

Right from the Introduction, Summary, and Conclusions in Chapter 1 one can read the posture that everybody who is interested in the smoking issue is already so familiar with — a belief that echos through the 565 pages of the document, plus the additional 36:

“Cigarette smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disability in developed countries and is a rapidly growing health problem in developing countries.”

“The magnitude and nature of the risks associated with smoking can be estimated using data from  prospective epidemiological studies of smokers and nonsmokers and information on smoking in the
population.”

What are such statements doing at the beginning of a supposedly scientific document? Once again, epidemiology — a non-science by definition — is used to propel and confirm an ideology — rather than discovering (or confirming) whether smoking actually causes disease according to the demanding parameters of hard science.

As that is not possible, the document uses epidemiological pseudo-science to justify cultural and social engineering policies, as well as a colossal enterprise of bureaucracy and state control that started with the US Surgeon General Report in 1964.

FORCES is supported solely by the efforts of the readers. Please become a member or donate what you can.



Contact Info
Forces Contacts
Media Contacts
Advertisers
Evidence Categories
Quick Look-Up
List of Methodological Errors in ETS Studies
Hill's Criteria and Authoritative Citations
What Must an Epidemiologic Study Warrant?
Table of All Studies on ETS and Lung Cancer up to 2006

Pie Charts of ETS/Lung Cancer Studies
How many cigarettes must be smoked to create an ETS danger?


Passive Smoking: an Institutional Problem
A 13-minute video to understand the fraud


If you like to read rather then listen, download
Now available for free